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    rh

    NUJ motions and resolutions for 2006 and 2007 can be seen here. Israel is the only country singled out for boycott and receives a disproportionate criticism.

    There is not any doubt in my mind that after reading through 2006 and 2007, a pro Muslim, Leftist Chavez camp rules.

    Impartiality anyone ?

    http://www.nuj.org.uk/inner.php?docid=1072

    Shamir

    Saturday, April 28 2007
    Balen Report Stays Under Wraps
    The BBC won a High Court ruling keeping the Balen report under wraps.

    In 2004, Malcolm Balen, for whom the report is named, exhaustively examined the BBC’s radio and TV coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. His report was never released to the public; however, Steven Sugar, a London lawyer, filed a Freedom of Information request. When the BBC refused, Sugar appealed to the Information Tribunal, which adjudicates FOI disputes. The tribunal ruled in Sugar’s favor, leading to a flood of FOI requests for the Balen Report (including one from HonestReporting).

    According to the UK Press Gazette, the BBC has rejected 400 other FOI requests over an unspecified period of time.

    The BBC is funded by a license fee and the public deserves to know what's contained in the report.

    Balen Report: Court Rules in BBC's Favour

    The BBC succeeds in preventing publication of the Balen Report.

    The long-running efforts to force the BBC to publish the contents of the Balen Report appear to have come to a sorry end in the High Court. A judge has overturned an order that the report should be made public under Freedom of Information laws.

    In 2004, Malcolm Balen exhaustively examined the BBC's radio and TV coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. His report was never released to the public; however, Stephen Sugar, a London lawyer, filed a request under FOI. When the BBC refused his request, Sugar appealed to the Information Tribunal, which adjudicates FOI disputes. The tribunal ruled in Sugar's favour, leading to a flood of FOI requests for the Balen Report (including one from HonestReporting UK, which was also rebuffed).

    However, as reported by the BBC:

    Mr Justice Davis, sitting in the High Court, accepted the Corporation's argument that the tribunal had no jurisdiction in a case where a public service broadcaster and the information commissioner agreed documents fell outside the scope of the act.

    The judge described the position as "most odd" and "potentially inconvenient in its consequence". There were, said Mr Justice Davis, "powerful reasons in favour of there being a right of appeal to the tribunal in circumstances such as the present".

    Commercial solicitor Mr Sugar, from Putney in south London, described the ruling as a "technical win" for the BBC. He added: "Perhaps the BBC Trust under its new chairman, will take a different view from BBC management and conclude it is in the public interest for Mr Balen's report to be published."

    We also hope that the BBC, if it has nothing to hide as it claims, will see fit to publish the Balen Report and allow the licence fee paying public to decide on its contents for themselves.

    BBC JOURNALISTS PROTEST NUJ BOYCOTT

    We commend the 272 NUJ members who work for the BBC who have sent the following petition to the NUJ executive :

    "As BBC journalists and NUJ members we are dismayed at the passing of a motion at ADM calling for a boycott of Israeli goods. As members of a corporation which prides itself on providing impartial news coverage, we cannot associate ourselves with a move which involves taking sides in any conflict. We call on the union to hold a ballot of all members to see whether they support the view taken at ADM on an issue which could have a profound effect on the way all British journalists are viewed at home and abroad."

    See the petition at: http://www.engageonline.org.uk/fighting/article.php?id=28

    While an admirable sentiment by these BBC journalists, we do wonder why they are suddenly prepared to oppose "taking sides in any conflict". After all, as noted, kidnapped BBC journalist Alan Johnston is regarded by BBC colleagues, Palestininan journalists and politicians as being openly supportive of the Palestinians.

    Not to mention other incidents such as Barbara Plett's tears for Arafat and Fayad Abu Shamala, a BBC correspondent in Gaza, who declared at a Hamas rally on May 6, 2001: "Journalists and media organisations [are] waging the campaign shoulder-to-shoulder together with the Palestinian people."

    For more on the BBC petition and other resources focused on effectively countering the NUJ boycott and other anti-Israel boycotts, see the Engage website:

    http://www.engageonline.org.uk/home/

    Jamal

    "Taking Alan Johnston [captive]," he said, "demonstrates the Palestinians' desperate way of drawing attention to their problems."


    This is not apologetic. it is reality when referring to a people that have to uses sticks and stones defend from an enemy with state of the art weaponary.

    Huldah

    Jamal, you are being too modest.

    The Kassam rocket may not be quite deadly enough for you - after all, it has to land very near people in order to kill or maim them, and it's true that Palestinian terrorists can't aim them well enough to do that effectively for now.

    Not to worry though. The Katyushas, mortars and other weapons pouring into the Gaza Strip via the porous border with Egypt should soon put Israel's enemies in a position to cause the sort destruction of life and property that they aspire to.

    Of course, this all comes at a cost - mainly to ordinary Palestinians who, once again, see their money and resources expended by their leaders upon the destruction of the Jewish State, rather than building up Palestinian infrastructure, health and job prospects.

    Still, that's democracy for you!

    Shamir


    Useful Idiots: An Endangered Species
    The Wall Street Journal's Bret Stephens wonders why the BBC allowed Alan Johnston to stay in Gaza long after it was no longer safe for foreign journalists. He suggests Johnston's usefulness to the Palestinians came to an end as chaos laid bare uglier truths that don't fit into the Beeb's world view:

    Still, whatever the benefits of staying on the right side of the Palestinian powers-that-be, they have begun to wane. For years, the BBC had invariably covered Palestinian affairs within the context of Israel's occupation--the core truth from which all manifestations of conflict supposedly derived. Developments within Gaza following Israel's withdrawal showed the hollowness of that analysis. Domestic Palestinian politics, it turned out, were shot through with their own discontents, contradictions and divisions, not just between Hamas and Fatah but between scores of clans, gangs, factions and personalities. Opposition to Israel helped in some ways to mute this reality, but it could not suppress it....
    Later, the BBC might ask itself whether its own failures of prudence and judgment put its reporter's life in jeopardy.


    Shamir

    Read this one:
    BBC staff production
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/theeditors/2007/05/alan.html


    Wednesday, May 30 2007
    Useful Idiots: An Endangered Species,
    Looks like the BBC didn't appreciate a recent column by the Wall Street Journal's Brett Stephens

    http://opinionjournal.com/columnists/bstephens/?id=110010108

    . Stephens wondered if Beeb bias contributed to allowing Alan Johnston to remain in Gaza long after other western journalists left. Fran Unsworth responds on The Editors blog. But Tom Gross raises a variation of Stephens' theory:

    Stephens’s view, however, is widely accepted among reporters covering the Middle East, including myself. It is common knowledge that Johnston, who was abducted in Gaza on March 12, was one of the most pro-Palestinian reporters in the region. However, sources tell me that some in Hamas may have felt that his reporting had become too pro-Fatah, which is one possible factor in his abduction by a Hamas-connected group, and also a possible reason why (despite the BBC’s repeated claims that the Hamas-led Palestinian Authority is doing everything in its power to secure Johnston’s release) in fact the Palestinian Authority has been doing next to nothing to help release the kidnapped BBC man.
    The Party With the Most to Gain"
    In the guise of respectable speculation, British journalist Alan Hart casts aspersion on Israel for Alan Johnston's disappearance:

    There is a case for saying (repeat a case) that the party with most to gain from Alan Johnston's permanent disappearance was Israel. It would not be the first time that Israeli agents had dressed as Arabs to make a hit.
    If Alan Johnston is dead, it's my hope that the BBC at executive management level will rise above its fear of offending Zionism too much and allow its reporters (Frank Gardner and Jeremy Bowen are second to none) to make a full, thorough and honest investigation.


    Here's our own Top 10 List of Parties Who Might Gain From Johnston's Kidnap:

    10. Rachel Corrie’s parents, who poisoned Yasser Arafat and also survived a kidnap attempt.

    9. Hanif Kureishi, who wanted to boost his short story, “Weddings and Beheadings.” Although a reading on BBC Radio-4 was postponed, Kureishi’s still in the papers, accusing the Beeb of censorship.

    8. Britain’s National of Union of Journalists needed to create a pretext for a three-day boycott of the PA to balance out their boycott of Israeli products.

    7. Alan Johnston staged his kidnap, but don’t take our word for it.

    6. The royal family knew in advance Prince William and Kate Middleton were on the rocks and foresaw a public opinion disaster. UK coverage of the royal breakup dovetailed too nicely with conveniently timed rumors of Johnston’s execution.

    5. Robert Fisk. Why not? He already wrote he'd beat up himself and any other Westerner he could find.

    4. French intelligence clearly gave Michael Moore advance notice of Al-Qaida’s plotting. Why wasn’t Moore in the World Trade Center filming Fahrenheit 9/11 that fateful day?

    3. If (repeat, if) a professional rivalry between Alan Hart and Alan Johnston went too far, Hart himself would certainly gain.

    2. Yvonne Ridley, who recently angered Australians during an Easter weekend speech. Seeking to atone for the failed gunpoint conversion of Steve Centanni and Olaf Wiig, Ridley tried again with Johnston.

    1. Desperate for cash, OJ Simpson is working on his next book, “If I Kidnapped Alan Johnston.”

    Shamir

    Read this one:
    BBC staff production
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/theeditors/2007/05/alan.html


    Wednesday, May 30 2007
    Useful Idiots: An Endangered Species,
    Looks like the BBC didn't appreciate a recent column by the Wall Street Journal's Brett Stephens

    http://opinionjournal.com/columnists/bstephens/?id=110010108

    . Stephens wondered if Beeb bias contributed to allowing Alan Johnston to remain in Gaza long after other western journalists left. Fran Unsworth responds on The Editors blog. But Tom Gross raises a variation of Stephens' theory:

    Stephens’s view, however, is widely accepted among reporters covering the Middle East, including myself. It is common knowledge that Johnston, who was abducted in Gaza on March 12, was one of the most pro-Palestinian reporters in the region. However, sources tell me that some in Hamas may have felt that his reporting had become too pro-Fatah, which is one possible factor in his abduction by a Hamas-connected group, and also a possible reason why (despite the BBC’s repeated claims that the Hamas-led Palestinian Authority is doing everything in its power to secure Johnston’s release) in fact the Palestinian Authority has been doing next to nothing to help release the kidnapped BBC man.
    The Party With the Most to Gain"
    In the guise of respectable speculation, British journalist Alan Hart casts aspersion on Israel for Alan Johnston's disappearance:

    There is a case for saying (repeat a case) that the party with most to gain from Alan Johnston's permanent disappearance was Israel. It would not be the first time that Israeli agents had dressed as Arabs to make a hit.
    If Alan Johnston is dead, it's my hope that the BBC at executive management level will rise above its fear of offending Zionism too much and allow its reporters (Frank Gardner and Jeremy Bowen are second to none) to make a full, thorough and honest investigation.


    Here's our own Top 10 List of Parties Who Might Gain From Johnston's Kidnap:

    10. Rachel Corrie’s parents, who poisoned Yasser Arafat and also survived a kidnap attempt.

    9. Hanif Kureishi, who wanted to boost his short story, “Weddings and Beheadings.” Although a reading on BBC Radio-4 was postponed, Kureishi’s still in the papers, accusing the Beeb of censorship.

    8. Britain’s National of Union of Journalists needed to create a pretext for a three-day boycott of the PA to balance out their boycott of Israeli products.

    7. Alan Johnston staged his kidnap, but don’t take our word for it.

    6. The royal family knew in advance Prince William and Kate Middleton were on the rocks and foresaw a public opinion disaster. UK coverage of the royal breakup dovetailed too nicely with conveniently timed rumors of Johnston’s execution.

    5. Robert Fisk. Why not? He already wrote he'd beat up himself and any other Westerner he could find.

    4. French intelligence clearly gave Michael Moore advance notice of Al-Qaida’s plotting. Why wasn’t Moore in the World Trade Center filming Fahrenheit 9/11 that fateful day?

    3. If (repeat, if) a professional rivalry between Alan Hart and Alan Johnston went too far, Hart himself would certainly gain.

    2. Yvonne Ridley, who recently angered Australians during an Easter weekend speech. Seeking to atone for the failed gunpoint conversion of Steve Centanni and Olaf Wiig, Ridley tried again with Johnston.

    1. Desperate for cash, OJ Simpson is working on his next book, “If I Kidnapped Alan Johnston.”

    Bonita

    Actually no. The BBC in general and eeaicsplly BBC News is the greatest and biggest source of news in the world. The BBC News and World Service have brought proper, unbiased, non-censored news to areas of the world where that is still a dream. BBC News have the best correspondents, graphics, newsreaders and choice of stories. The BBC is the best broadcasting organisation in the world and BBC News is the best news organisation in the world.

    Webby

    it weren't so sad, it would be funny. Palestine rockets Israel, then Israel bombs peilstane.And FYI, there's no such things as forbidden rickets and warplanes . I don't see anything in the laws of war forbidding rockets or aeroplanes. Hiding in civilian populations is highly illegal.

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